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08年12月英语六级考试预测卷--听力
ⅢListening Comprehension(35 minutes)




Section A
11. A) Home economics.
B) Business administration.
C) Computer programing.
D) Historical research.

12. A) Gas station.
B) Police station.
C) Lost and found department.
D) Bar.

13. A) The park is nearby.
B) He doesn't know about the park.
C) There's no parking here.
D) He doesn't understand the question.

14. A) There'll be heavy rain in places.
B) There'll be heavy snow in places.
C) There'll be a strong wind.
D) There'll be fog in all places.

15. A) Her sister works at the bakery.
B) The man is no judge of cakes.
C) She's surprised the man thinks she can cook.
D) Her sister bakes delicious cakes.

16. A) He'll tell her what she's missed.
B) He'll give her the new exam dates.
C) He'll take her to the next class.
D) He'll try to bring her homework to class.

17. A) He also needs a new tennis racket.
B) He wants to borrow some money too.
C) He doesn't think Brain will repay the loan.
D) He couldn't get Brain to play tennis.

18. A) Because she didn't like the color.
B) Because it was too small.
C) Because it was too big.
D) Because it was too expensive.


Questions19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
19. A) Required textbooks.
B) Used books.
C) Books on a "suggested readings" list.
D) Children's books.

20. A) $40. B) $80. C) $120. D) $160.

21. A) If a student has written a note in it.
B) If it was purchased at another store.
C) If a professor decides to use another text.
D) If it is more than a year old.


Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
22. A) Last week. B) Last month. C) Last night. D) Two weeks ago.

23. A) They are too complicated.
B) They are incomplete.
C) They are really bad.
D) They are out of date.

24. A) Buy some new books.
B) Change the librarians there.
C) Check all the cards and reprint them where necessary.
D) Change the library management system.

25. A) Three books. B) Five books.
C) Six books. D) At most ten books.


Section B
Passage One
Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
26. A) Several explorers. B) Representatives of Congress.
C) President Grant. D) A group of animal lovers.

27. A) It was the first national park.
B) It was the first region explored by pioneers.
C) It is not accessible to everyone.
D) It is not managed by the National Park service.

28. A) To build fires. B) To conduct scientific studies.
C) To train other staff members. D) To guide nature walks.


Passage Two
Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
29. A) From the library, the ASPCA and books including puppy training.
B) From all books for raising and training dogs.
C) By buying a dog from a pet store.
D) By discussing in families.

30. A) Because they are easy to feed and train.
B) Because they are very big and powerful.
C) Because they can protect family from being stolen.
D) Because they provide companionship as well as protection.

31. A) They don't need much space. B) They are small and easy to train.
C) They don't need to be walked daily. D) All of the above.


Passage Three
Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
32. A) Plants can produce some poisonous chemicals for www.cet6w.com insects.
B) Insect have been eating plants for many million years.
C) Insects have developed ways of dealing with poisonous chemicals produced by plants themselves.
D) Insects have already developed some resistance to man-made poisons.

33. A) The use of insecticides should be limited and controlled.
B) A combination of some insecticides should be used at the same time.
C) New insects should be introduced to mate with those that have survived from a certain kind of insecticide.
D) New kinds of insecticides should be explored and developed.

34. A) Insects would be out of control some day if nothing were done about the present situation.
B) Insects will some day devour all green vegetable matter on earth.
C) Insects have developed resistance to both botanical and artificial poisons rapidly.
D) Insects are the most adaptable creatures.

35. A) Insects out of Control. B) An Urgent Challenge in Agriculture.
C) How to Use Insecticides Properly. D) Insects and Insecticides.


Section C
Imagine this: you wake up each morning to find your sister lying beside you. To get dressed and tie your (36)______, you use one hand and she uses another, you do everything else together too, even sitting on the same chair at lunch and (37)______on the same bicycle. That's what life is like for six-year-old Betty and Abey. Like most (38)______ , the two girls look very much alike. But unlike most twins, Betty and Abey (39)______parts of the same body. Twins like Betty and Abey are (40)______, only about 40 sets are born in the United States each year. Few (41)______ as long as Betty and Abey. That is because twins often share vital organs like a heart or (42)______. These shared organs are often badly shaped, and may not be strong enough to support both twins. But Betty and Abey each had her own head, heart and stomach which (43) normally. The girls share 3 or 4 lungs which provide plenty of oxygen for both twins. (44)_____________________ . Betty and Abey live relatively normal lives, they attend a regular school and each does her own school work. They prefer to do some projects together, though. (45) ___________________________ . But sometimes the girls don't want to do the same thing. (46) ________________________. What do they do then? "We cast a coin." Says Abey.

Part Ⅲ Listening Comprehension
Section A
11. B 12. A 13. B 14. D 15. C 16. A 17. C 18. B
19. A 20. B 21. C 22. A 23. A 24. C 25. D

11. W: I heard Marilyn's going to college. What's she studying?
M: She's taking courses in statistics, economics and accounting.

Q: What career does Marilyn probably plan to follow?

12. W: This doesn't look at all familiar. We must be lost. We'd better get some directions.
M: Let's pull in here. While I'm filling the tank, you ask about the directions and get me a soft drink.

Q: Where will the man and woman go for assistance?

13. W: Excuse me! Could you please tell me how to get to the park?
M: There's a park around here?

Q: What does the man's response indicate?

14. W: It's nearly ten o'clock. Let's listen to the weather forecast.
M: Here's the weather forecast. Fog is spreading from the east and will affect all areas by midnight. It'll be heavy in places.

Q: What is the weather forecast?

15. M: This cake's delicious! Did you make it yourself?
W: You must be kidding! My sister got it from the bakery.

Q: What does the woman mean?

16. W: I'm worried about those classes I missed when I was sick.
M: I'll try to bring you up to date on what we've done.

Q: What does the man mean?

17. W: If I can get Brian to pay back the money I lent him last week, I could get that new tennis racket.
M: I hope you have better luck than I did.

Q: What does the man imply?

18. W: I'd like to exchange this dress for one-a size larger.
M: Yes, of course. Pick out another one. I'll put this one back.

Q: Why did the customer return the dress?

Conversation One
W: That comes to $160.
M: A hundred and sixty dollars! I just can't believe how expensive textbooks are. And that's just for required texts. Why, if I had to buy all the books on my suggested reading lists, I'd have to take out a bank loan!

W: You could save some money if you bought used texts, you know.
M: I suppose, but it's hard for me to study from a text that's been marked up. Tell me, if I don't need some of these books, can I get a full refund?

W: Sure, if the professor changes his mind about a book or if you drop a course, just return it and we'll give you your money back-but only for the first three weeks of class. So don't write your name in the textbook or mark it up until you're sure you're going to keep it all semester.

M: And what about at the end of the semester? What's your buy-back policy?
W: As long as the books are in reasonably good condition, and they're going to be used in class the next semester, we'll give you 50 percent of their original value-even if you didn't buy them at this store. Of course, if a professor changes texts or if a new edition comes out, we won't buy them back at all.

M: Fifty percent-that's all?
W: Well. I suppose that doesn't sound like much, but that's the store policy.

19. What is the man buying?
20. If the man sells all the books that he buys today back to the store at the end of the semester, how much money will he receive?
21. Why would the bookstore NOT buy back the man's books at any price?

Conversation Two
W: Good morning, Peter.
M: Good morning, Julia.
W: Do come in. You've brought the results with you, I see.

M: Yes, in fact, I completed the survey last week.
W: So, I can hear the criticisms now, then?

M: That's right. And perhaps you'll be able to tell me what can be done about them.
W: I'll certainly do my best. Well, what would you like to start with?

M: The catalogues. I'm afraid many of the science students complain that they're incomplete and out of date. They think they're really bad. Is there anything you can do to improve things there?

W: Oh, yes. We can check all the cards and reprint them where necessary...or we can change to a computer system.

M: How much would it cost to do the first?
W: About six thousand pounds.

M: And how long would it take?
W: Oh, maybe three months.

M: And how much would it cost to do the second?
W: Change to a computer system? Yes, oh, about sixty thousand pounds.

M: And how long would that take?
W: Er, nine months, I'd say. About nine months.

M: Thank you. Now...next I'd like to move on to the Borrowing facilities. The social science students described these as rather disappointing. They complained that they were only allowed to borrow three books. Most of them felt they ought to be able to borrow more books, perhaps five or six for undergraduates and up to ten for graduates.
W: That may be possible.

M: Also, they'd like to be able to keep the books for a longer period, say three weeks instead of the present two.
W: That also sounds reasonable. I'll see what I can do.

22. When did the man finish his survey?
23. What do students NOT complain about the library catalogues?
24. What does the woman say about the first possibility of the library work?
25. How many books are requested by graduates to borrow?

Section B
26. A 27. A 28. D 29. A 30. D 31. D 32. D 33. D 34. A 35. D

Passage One
Welcome to Yellow Stone National Park. Before we begin our nature walk today, I'd like to give you a short history of our national park service. The national park service began in the late 1800s. A small group of explorers had just completed a month long exploration of the region that is now Yellow Stone. They gathered around the campfire and after hours of discussion, they decided that they should not claim this land for themselves. They felt it should be accessible to everyone. So they began a campaign to preserve this land for everyone's enjoyment. Two years later, in the late 19 century, an act of congress signed by President Ulysses S. Grant, proclaimed the Yellow Stone region a public park. It was the first national park in the world. After Yellow Stone became a public park, many other areas of great scenic importance were set aside. And in 1916 the national park service was established to manage these parks. As a park ranger, I am an employee of the national park service. In the national park, park rangers are on duty at all the times to answer questions and help visitors in any difficulty. Nature walks, guided tours and campfire talks are offered by specially trained staff members. The park service also protect the animals and plants within the parks.

26. According to the speaker, who originated the idea of the public park?

27. What does the speaker say about Yellow Stone National Park?

28. According to the speaker, what is one of the duties of a park ranger?

Passage Two

Is your family interested in buying a dog? A dog can be a happy addition to your family, but if you choose the wrong kind of dog, the consequences can cause you a lot of trouble.Families should sit down and thoroughly discuss the problems involved before buying a dog. Even if the children in your family are the ones who want the dog, the parents are the ones who are really responsible for seeing that the animal is properly cared for. If you don't know much about dogs, it's a good idea to go to the library or the ASPCA for books about various kinds of dogs, as well as books about how to train a puppy. In reading about the different breeds, you should know that a dog described as very alert may be too jumpy and bouncy. When a book describes a dog as an ideal hunting dog, it probably means that the dog won't be happy living in a small apartment. Dog breeds vary in popularity as the years go by. One of the most popular dogs these days is the German shepherd, this is because it provides protection as well as companionship. The family should be warned that these dogs grow up to be very big, and may be too powerful for children to handle. If space is limited, they need to be walked daily, since they cannot exercise in the space available at home.

29. How can one get information about the different kinds of dogs?
30. Why is the German shepherd a popular dog?
31. What are the advantages of choosing a toy dog?

Passage Three
Scientists have observed that plants themselves produce many poisonous chemicals for www.cet6w.com insects. But insects have developed ways of dealing with them and, in fact, have been eating plants for about 250 million years. Now insects are using these same mechanisms to deal with man-made poisons-insecticides. This is why resistance of insects to insecticides has developed so rapidly. What should be done? Scientists studying the problem suggest that farmers use less insecticides. At the moment, farmers regularly spray crops as a precaution against www.cet6w.com are caused by large numbers of pests. They should, instead, spray only where pests have actually been seen. Secondly, farmers could use a combination of two or three insecticides at once. To survive, the insects would need to become resistant to two or more poisons at the same time. The most surprising suggestion, perhaps, is that, at certain times of the year, farmers should actually try to attract new insects onto the crops they are trying to protect. The new insects will mate with those which survived from a certain kind of insecticide and will lessen the latter's resistance to it.

Scientists hope that these and other measures will postpone the day when farmers and scientists will have to stand by while new super bugs which may be resistant to all our poisons invade our farms and devour our crops.

32. What alarming conclusion can be drawn from the scientists'observation?
33. Which of the following is NOT included in the scientists'suggestions?
34. What can be inferred from the passage?
35. What do you think is the best title for the passage?

Section C
Imagine this: you wake up each morning to find your sister lying beside you. To get dressed and tie your (36) shoes, you use one hand and she uses another, you do everything else together too, even sitting on the same chair at lunch and (37) riding on the same bicycle. That's what life is like for six-year-old Betty and Abey. Like most (38) twins, the two girls look very much alike. But unlike most twins, Betty and Abey (39) share parts of the same body. Twins like Betty and Abey are (40) rare, only about 40 sets are born in the United States each year. Few (41) survive as long as Betty and Abey. That is because twins often share vital organs like a heart or (42) brain. These shared organs are often badly shaped, and may not be strong enough to support both twins. But Betty and Abey each had her own head, heart and stomach which (43) function normally. The girls share 3 or 4 lungs which provide plenty of oxygen for both twins. (44) Most their completely shared organs lie below the waist. Betty and Abey live relatively normal lives, they attend a regular school and each does her own school work. They prefer to do some projects together, though. (45) For example, to cut out paper dolls, one twin holds the paper while the other uses the scissors. But sometimes the girls don't want to do the same thing. (46) For example, sometimes they want to play with different toys. What do they do then? "We cast a coin." Says Abey.








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